Products for USB Sensing and Control

Products for USB Sensing and Control

PhidgetTemperatureSensor 1-Input

ID: 1051_0
Connect a thermocouple to this board to measure the temperature of an object or area. Plugs directly into a USB port.

Replaced by 1051_2

Replaced by the 1051 - PhidgetTemperatureSensor 1-Input.

The PhidgetTemperatureSensor can be used with E, K, J, and T-type thermocouples. When connected to a K-Type thermocouple, the PhidgetTemperatureSensor can measure temperatures from -200 to +1200 degrees Celsius. The temperature range varies with the type of thermocouple being used.

The 1051 sensor outputs the temperature in Degrees Celsius or as the Potential Voltage generated by the thermocouple probe.

Cold Junction Compensation- The temperature at the point where the thermocouple wires return to the PhidgetTemperatureSensor (the cold junction) must be taken into account. Measurement of this temperature allows for the compensation of temperature variations of the Phidget that would affect the thermocouple voltages. In the case of the PhidgetTemperatureSensor, an on-board temperature sensor continually monitors the board temperature near the connector and provides the data required by the Phidget APIs to adjust for this.

Comes packaged with a 180cm USB Cable, and a Getting Started Manual.

Product History

Date Board Revision Device Version Comment
October 20030100Product Release
January 20050200Noise performance improved to 2 Celsius
May 2006 0201Added range checking on AD value
October 20081300More accurate ambient temperature sensor. Added support for E, J, and T-type thermocouples in the API library, on-board noise filtering.
April 2010 2400Mini USB connector, new thermocouple connector
May 2010 2401Fixed setLabel
May 2011 2402getLabelString fixed for labels longer than 7 characters

Getting Started

Welcome to the 1051 user guide! In order to get started, make sure you have the following hardware on hand:


Next, you will need to connect the pieces:

1051 2 Connecting The Hardware.jpg
  1. Connect the thermocouple to the inputs on the Phidget TemperatureSensor. The datasheet or product page for the thermocouple should tell you which wire is positive and which is negative.
  2. Connect the Phidget to your computer using the USB cable.


Now that you have everything together, let's start using the 1051!

Using the 1051

Phidget Control Panel

In order to demonstrate the functionality of the 1051, the Phidget Control Panel running on a Windows machine will be used.


The Phidget Control Panel is available for use on both macOS and Windows machines. If you would like to follow along, first take a look at the getting started guide for your operating system:


Linux users can follow the getting started with Linux guide and continue reading here for more information about the 1051.

First Look

After plugging the 1051 into your computer and opening the Phidget Control Panel, you will see something like this:

1051 Panel.jpg


The Phidget Control Panel will list all connected Phidgets and associated objects, as well as the following information:

  • Serial number: allows you to differentiate between similar Phidgets.
  • Channel: allows you to differentiate between similar objects on a Phidget.
  • Version number: corresponds to the firmware version your Phidget is running. If your Phidget is listed in red, your firmware is out of date. Update the firmware by double-clicking the entry.


The Phidget Control Panel can also be used to test your device. Double-clicking on an object will open an example.

Temperature Sensor (Thermocouple)

Double-click on the Temperature Sensor object, labelled Thermocouple Input, in order to run the example:

1051 TemperatureSensorThermocouple Example.jpg


General information about the selected object will be displayed at the top of the window. You can also experiment with the following functionality:

  • Modify the change trigger and/or data interval value by dragging the sliders. For more information on these settings, see the data interval/change trigger page.
  • Select your thermocouple type from the Thermocouple Type drop-down menu.
  • The measured temperature will be updated next to the Temperature label. Touch the thermocouple wire with your hands to see the temperature increase. If the temperature decreases when it should be increasing, you may have the wires plugged in incorrectly.


Temperature Sensor (IC)

Double-click on the Temperature Sensor object , labelled Temperature Sensor (IC), in order to run the example:

1051 TemperatureSensorIC Example.jpg


General information about the selected object will be displayed at the top of the window. You can also experiment with the following functionality:

  • Modify the change trigger and/or data interval value by dragging the sliders. For more information on these settings, see the data interval/change trigger page.
  • The measured temperature can be seen next to the Temperature label. Cover the board with your hands to see the temperature quickly rise.


Voltage Input

Double-click on the Voltage Input object in order to run the example:

1051 VoltageInput Example.jpg


General information about the selected object will be displayed at the top of the window. You can also experiment with the following functionality:

  • Modify the change trigger and/or data interval value by dragging the sliders. For more information on these settings, see the data interval/change trigger page.

Technical Details

Cold Junction Compensation and Self-heating

Thermocouples consist of two junctions, one where the thermocouple meets the Phidget and one where the two wires are welded together at the sensing end of the device. In simplified terms, a thermocouple works by detecting the temperature difference between these two junctions. As such, in order to measure the temperature at the sensing end we need to know the temperature where the thermocouple connects to the Phidget. To do so, there is an ambient temperature sensor on the board.

An important thing to note is that the ambient temperature sensor measures the temperature of the board and the air around it, though not specifically at the junction. Generally you can assume they are nearly the same temperature, however as the electronics heat up by being powered on there can be some small error introduced. This is exacerbated by having the board in an enclosed space where normal airflow is restricted thereby increasing the effect of self-heating. As a result we recommend that the board be left in as open and well ventilated/cooled a place as possible to minimize this error source.

For more information on thermocouples, check out the Thermocouple Primer.

What to do Next

  • Software Overview - Find your preferred programming language here to learn how to write your own code with Phidgets!
  • General Phidget Programming - Read this general guide to the various aspects of programming with Phidgets. Learn how to log data into a spreadsheet, use Phidgets over the network, and much more.
  • Phidget22 API - The API is a universal library of all functions and definitions for programming with Phidgets. Just select your language and device and it'll give you a complete list of all properties, methods, events, and enumerations that are at your disposal.

Software Objects

Channel NameAPIChannel
Thermocouple Input TemperatureSensor 0
Temperature Sensor (IC) TemperatureSensor 1
Voltage Input VoltageInput 0

API


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