Difference between revisions of "Language - Visual Basic .NET"

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<metadesc>Communicate over USB with sensors, controllers and relays with Phidgets! Our VB.Net library runs in Windows using Visual Studio or Mono.</metadesc>
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<metadesc>Communicate over USB with sensors, controllers and relays with Phidgets! Our Visual Basic .NET library supports Windows using Visual Studio or Mono.</metadesc>
 
[[Category:Language]]
 
[[Category:Language]]
__TOC__
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__NOTOC__
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We provide support for the Visual Basic .NET language on the Windows operating system. We also provide instructions on how to get your project started in a number of common development environments. Select your operating system and preferred development environment below, and follow the instructions to get your project running with Phidgets.
  
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If you do not know which development environment you want to use, or your development environment of choice is not listed, we recommend starting with Mono as the simplest path to getting your code running. Visual Studio is the most popular way to build Visual Basic .NET projects, but it also has a steep learning curve.
  
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General information of how to use Phidgets with Visual Basic .NET can be found in the '''Write Code''' section of each development environment page. This information is consistent across all pages.
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==Choose Your Development Environment:==
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 +
{{Language_-_Visual_Basic_.NET_Dev_Environment_Table}}
  
 
== Quick Downloads ==
 
== Quick Downloads ==
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If you already know what you're doing and just need the files, you can find them all below.
  
 
=== Documentation ===
 
=== Documentation ===
  
*{{Phidget22API}} (Select C#/VB.Net from drop-down menu)
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*{{Phidget22API}} (Select Visual Basic .NET from drop-down menu)
  
 
=== Example Code ===
 
=== Example Code ===
  
*{{SampleCode|VBNET|VB.Net Examples}}
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*{{SampleCode|VBNET|Visual Basic .NET Examples}}
 
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=== Libraries ===
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{{WindowsQuickDownloads}}
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== Getting Started with VB.NET ==
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Welcome to using Phidgets with VB.NET! By using VB.NET, you will have access to the complete {{Phidget22API}}, including events. We also provide example code in VB.NET for all Phidget devices.
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== Windows ==
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{{Windows_Languages}}
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===Visual Studio===
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====Use Our Examples====
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One of the best ways to start programming with Phidgets is to use our example code as a guide. In order to run the examples, you will need to download and install [https://www.visualstudio.com/ Microsoft Visual Studio].
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Now that you have Microsoft Visual Studio installed, select an example that will work with your Phidget:
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*{{SampleCode|VBNET|VB.NET Examples}}
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Open the example project and start the example by pressing the ''Start'' button:
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[[File:Csharp_visualstudio_run.png ‎|link=|center]]
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The application will open the Phidget, list basic information about the Phidget, and demonstrate the Phidget's functionality. Here is an example of a Digital Output channel on a RFID Phidget:
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[[File:Csharp_visualstudio_rfid.PNG|link=|center]]
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You should now have the example up and running for your device. Play around with the device and experiment with some of the functionality. When you are ready, the next step is configuring your project and writing your own code!
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=====VINT Hub=====
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If you are trying to connect to one of the VINT hub ports directly rather than to a VINT device connected through a VINT hub then there is one additional step.  There is a isHubPort property of the Phidget class that must be set before calling open.  It defaults to false but in this case it will need to be set to true.  In our examples this is done via command line though in practice you can just set it before calling open.  To add command line parameters to your project in Visual Studio, you can go to the Project->Properties screen.  Under the Debug section there is a field to enter command line parameters for startup.  Use "-h" to make sure isHubPort is set before open is called and then you should be good to go.
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[[File:Csharp_visualstudio_commandLineParameters.png|link=|center]]
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====Configure Your Project====
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When you are building a project from scratch, or adding Phidget functionality to an existing project, you'll need to configure your development environment to properly link the Phidget .NET library. To begin:
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Create a new Windows Forms Application project:
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[[Image:Vbnet_newproject.PNG|link=|center]]
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Next, right-click to add a reference to the Phidget .NET library:
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[[Image:CSharp_VS2015_Add_Reference.png|link=|center]]
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On the following screen, click ''Browse...'' and navigate to the location of Phidget22.NET.dll:
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*C:\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22\Phidget22.NET.dll
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[[Image:CSharp_VS2015_Add_Reference_2.png|link=|center]]
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Finally, to include the Phidget .NET library, add the following lines to main window class file:
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<syntaxhighlight lang="csharp">
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Imports Phidget22
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Imports Phidget22.Events
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</syntaxhighlight>
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Success! The project now has access to Phidgets. Next, view the [[#Write Code | write your own code]] section located below.
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===Mono===
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====Use Our Examples====
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One of the best ways to start programming with Phidgets is to use our example code as a guide. In order to run the examples, you will need to download and install [http://www.mono-project.com/download/ Mono] for Windows.
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Now that you have Mono installed, download and unpack the HelloWorld example for C#. This example uses the [[Phidget Manager]] to list all Phidget channels that can be accessed by your computer:
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*[{{SERVER}}/downloads/phidget22/examples/dotnet/csharp/Manager/Phidget22_HelloWorld_CSharp_Windows_Ex.zip HelloWorld example]
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Note: The HelloWorld example is compatible with Mono because it does not use Windows Forms. All other C# examples use Windows Forms.
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Next, copy Phidget22.NET.dll from type the following location:
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*C:\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22\Phidget22.NET.dll
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Place both the HelloWorld example and the Phidget22.NET.dll file in the same location. Your folder should now look something like this:
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[[File:Vbnet_folder.PNG|link=|center]]
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Open the command prompt at the folder location and enter the following command:
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<syntaxhighlight lang='bash'>
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vbnc /r:Phidget22.NET.dll Module1.vb
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</syntaxhighlight>
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This will create an executable file called ''Module1.exe''. Type in the following command to run the example:
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<syntaxhighlight lang='bash'>
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mono Module1.exe
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</syntaxhighlight>
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[[File:Vbnet_mono.PNG|link=|center]]
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You should now have the example up and running. When you are ready, the next step is configuring your project and writing your own code!
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+
====Configure Your Project====
+
When you are building a project from scratch, or adding Phidget functionality to an exisiting project, you'll need to configure your development environment to properly link the Phidget .NET library.
+
 
+
To include the Phidget .NET library, simply add the following lines to your code:
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<syntaxhighlight lang='CSharp'>
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Imports Phidget22
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Imports Phidget22.Events
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</syntaxhighlight>
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The project now has access to Phidgets. Next, view the [[#Write Code | write your own code]] section located below.
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==Write Code==
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{{WriteCode_Intro|VB.NET|VBNET}}
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=== Step One: Initialize and Open ===
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You will need to declare your Phidget object in your code. For example, we can declare a digital input object like this:
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<syntaxhighlight lang='vbnet'>
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ch = New Phidget22.DigitalInput()
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</syntaxhighlight>
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Next, we can open the Phidget object like this:
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<syntaxhighlight lang='vbnet'>
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ch.Open()
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</syntaxhighlight>
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Although we are not including it on this page, you should include error handling for all Phidget functions. Here is an example of the previous code with error handling:
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<syntaxhighlight lang='vbnet'>
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Try
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  ch = New Phidget22.DigitalInput()
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  ch.Open()
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Catch ex As PhidgetException
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  errorBox.addMessage("Error initializing: " + ex.Message)
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End Try
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</syntaxhighlight>
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=== Step Two: Wait for Attachment (Plugging In) of the Phidget ===
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Simply calling open does not guarantee you can use the Phidget immediately. To use a Phidget, it must be plugged in (attached). We can handle this by using event driven programming and tracking the attach events. Alternatively, we can modify our code so we wait for an attachment:
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<syntaxhighlight lang='vbnet'>
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ch = New Phidget22.DigitalInput()
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ch.Open(5000);
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</syntaxhighlight>
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Waiting for attachment will block indefinitely until a connection is made, or until the timeout value is exceeded
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To use events to handle attachments, we have to add the following code:
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<syntaxhighlight lang='vbnet'>
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Private Sub device_Attach(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As Phidget22.Events.AttachEventArgs) Handles ch.Attach
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  Console.WriteLine("Phidget Attached!");
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End Sub
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</syntaxhighlight>
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=== Step Three: Do Things with the Phidget ===
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We recommend the use of event driven programming when working with Phidgets. In a similar way to handling an attach event as described above, we can also add an event handler for a state change event:
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<syntaxhighlight lang=vbnet>
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Private Sub device_DigitalInputChange(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As Phidget22.Events.DigitalInputStateChangeEventArgs) Handles ch.StateChange
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  stateText.Text = "State: " + e.State;
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End Sub
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</syntaxhighlight>
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If events do not suit your needs, you can also poll the device directly for data using code like this:
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<syntaxhighlight lang=vbnet>
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state= device.State;
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stateText.Text = "State: " + e.State;
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</syntaxhighlight>
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=== Step Four: Close and Delete ===
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At the end of your program, be sure to close and delete your device:
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<syntaxhighlight lang=vbnet>
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device.Close();
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</syntaxhighlight>
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== Further Reading ==
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[[Phidget Programming Basics]] - Here you can find the basic concepts to help you get started with making your own programs that use Phidgets.
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[[Data Interval/Change Trigger]] - Learn about these two properties that control how much data comes in from your sensors.
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[[Using Multiple Phidgets]] - It can be difficult to figure out how to use more than one Phidget in your program. This page will guide you through the steps.
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[[Polling vs. Events]] - Your program can gather data in either a polling-driven or event-driven manner. Learn the difference to determine which is best for your application.
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[[Logging, Exceptions, and Errors]] - Learn about all the tools you can use to debug your program.
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===Libraries===
  
[[Phidget Network Server]] - Phidgets can be controlled and communicated with over your network- either wirelessly or over ethernet.
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{{AllQuickDownloads}}

Revision as of 20:45, 20 August 2018


We provide support for the Visual Basic .NET language on the Windows operating system. We also provide instructions on how to get your project started in a number of common development environments. Select your operating system and preferred development environment below, and follow the instructions to get your project running with Phidgets.

If you do not know which development environment you want to use, or your development environment of choice is not listed, we recommend starting with Mono as the simplest path to getting your code running. Visual Studio is the most popular way to build Visual Basic .NET projects, but it also has a steep learning curve.

General information of how to use Phidgets with Visual Basic .NET can be found in the Write Code section of each development environment page. This information is consistent across all pages.

Choose Your Development Environment:

Visual Basic .NET Development Environments
OS - Windows Windows

C VS WIN.png C VS WIN on.png

CS MONO WIN.png CS MONO WIN on.png

Quick Downloads

If you already know what you're doing and just need the files, you can find them all below.

Documentation

Example Code

Libraries