Problem with Motor controler 1065

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Yoogie
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Problem with Motor controler 1065

Postby Yoogie » Sat Jul 21, 2012 10:40 am

Good day. I purchased myself 3 x 1065 control boards but I am now having some problems.
Firstly I plug it in and it is detected by the software and works really well but for some reason current is not displaying any info. Can someone tell me what might be the problem there? Should it constantly give me a current reading?
Secondly, when I set the target velocity really low, like between 1 and 10 and then I get no movement on the motor. If I help the motor along it moves. But once I stop helping it it comes to a dead stop. I need this motor to turn really slowly, needing it to just creep along and have a good amount of torque.
Can someone please help me out with these problems, I do not want to use stepper motors. I am using a DC motor with a optical encoder on it with a final rpm of 28.

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burley
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Re: Problem with Motor controler 1065

Postby burley » Mon Jul 23, 2012 7:26 am

The velocity setting is an indication of how much current you are supplying to the motor. When the current is too low, you are unable to overcome the motors internal friction especially with a gearbox which adds yet more friction. Still, you should be able to increase the velocity value enough that the motor starts turning but is still turning very slowly.
Brian Burley
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fraser
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Re: Problem with Motor controler 1065

Postby fraser » Mon Jul 23, 2012 8:34 am

It is not ideal to run the motor on the lowest possible velocity setting that makes it rotate, because you are then on the verge of stalling at all times. You ideally want to be as close to maximum power as possible for DC motors, which in general exists close to half of maximum velocity (depending on your load). So I would recommend using a geared down motor so that you can run the 1065 at higher velocities while getting the slow RPM you desire.

DC motors are also very inefficient at extremely slow speeds, so that is another good reason for having a more heavily geared DC motor.

Yoogie
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Re: Problem with Motor controler 1065

Postby Yoogie » Tue Jul 24, 2012 5:12 am

Thanks for the advice guys. The motors that i have got are heavily geared as it is... problem is it is still not slow enough.

Would it be possible for me to give the motor power for 5milli seconds, then stop for 5 and then do that in a loop to make it move really slowly? (5 is just a example)

and if that is possible how can i make it that the motor stops at a exact position on the encoder. From what i have seen this encoder counts so fast it will be virtually impossible.

I am totally new to this and don't really have a clue how to do it. trying to help a friend out.

fraser
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Re: Problem with Motor controler 1065

Postby fraser » Tue Jul 24, 2012 8:35 am

A few questions that might help me solve your problem:

At what velocity setting does the motor begin to move on its own?

What power supply are you using with the 1065?

Did you buy the motor from phidgets? if so, what part number is it? if not, could you give me the manufacturer part number of the motor?

To answer your question, pulsing the velocity on and off is not likely going to help you since the 1065 essentially works by doing the same thing, just at a higher frequency.

And solving the problem of making the motor stop at a certain encoder position is a matter of understanding something called a Control System - You will need to do a bit of research to under stand how it works, and write a bit of code in order to make it work. There are a number of helpful sources on the internet for writing simple control systems for DC motor control based off of encoder position. I can help you with that, but first lets solve the problem of making your motor work.

Yoogie
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Re: Problem with Motor controler 1065

Postby Yoogie » Wed Jul 25, 2012 2:12 am

The motor only begins to move once you set it's velocity to 13... once it is moving i can lower it to 8... but it has no power what so ever.

I am driving the motor off a 12 volt 8 amp hour battery which is currently sitting at about 12.5 volts under a load.

Currently have 3 motors and 3 boards.
2 x http://www.phidgets.com/products.php?ca ... id=3263E_0
1 x http://www.phidgets.com/products.php?ca ... id=3264E_0

The idea behind purchasing these motors and boards was to make a 3 axis time laps rig. Problem is that these motors travel far to fast for what I am needing. The main bed for the rig is about a meter long, it takes it will take 26 turns of the motor to move it completely across the bed at full speed which is no good, means it will take 1 min for the rig to move all the way across. I need it to be able to cross the bed in say 8 hours.

I was really expecting the control boards to be able to slow the motors down alot...

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Patrick
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Re: Problem with Motor controler 1065

Postby Patrick » Wed Jul 25, 2012 8:46 am

It sounds like you would be better off with stepper motors then DC motors for this problem. I imagine we could do an exchange if you are interested.

It's certainly possible to write a control system that will move your system in 8 hours - but you won't be able to just set a velocity that slow enough, you will need to use position/velocity PID loops with the encoder, and the movement will not be perfectly smooth. With steppers, you can simply step at a slow velocity and achieve perfectly uniform motion.

-Patrick


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