Difference between revisions of "Language - Visual Basic .NET"

From Phidgets Support
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
 
[[Category:Language]]
 
[[Category:Language]]
{{OSLang|[[File:icon-Visual Basic Net.png|64x64px|left|link=|alt=]]|Visual Basic .NET, developed by [http://www.microsoft.com Microsoft] is a modern object oriented programming language and the successor to Visual Basic 6.0}}
 
 
__TOC__
 
__TOC__
  
== Introduction ==
 
  
If this is your first time working with a Phidget, we suggest starting with the Getting Started page for your specific device. This can be found in the user guide for your device. That page will walk you through installing drivers and libraries for your operating system, and will then bring you back here to use VB.NET specifically.
 
VB.NET is capable of using the complete {{Phidget22API}}, including events. We also provide example code in VB.NET for all Phidget devices.
 
 
VB.NET with Phidgets is only supported on Windows, and can be used with [[#Visual_Studio_2015|Visual Studio 2015]], [[#Mono|Mono]], or [[#MonoDevelop/Xamarin_Studio|MonoDevelop]].
 
  
 
== Quick Downloads ==
 
== Quick Downloads ==
Line 25: Line 19:
  
 
== Getting Started with VB.NET ==
 
== Getting Started with VB.NET ==
 
+
Welcome to using Phidgets with VB.NET! By using VB.NET, you will have access to the complete {{Phidget22API}}, including events. We also provide example code in VB.NET for all Phidget devices.
If you are new to writing code for Phidgets, we recommend starting by running, then modifying existing examples. This will allow you to:
+
{{ExampleCodeReasons}}
+
 
+
Instructions are divided up by operating system. Choose:
+
*[[#Windows(XP/Vista/7)|Windows XP / Vista / 7]]
+
  
 
== Windows ==
 
== Windows ==
===Description of Library Files===
+
{{Windows_Languages}}
Visual Basic .NET programs on Windows depend on the following files, which the installers above put onto your system:
+
*'''phidget22.dll''' contains the actual Phidget library, which is used at run-time. By default, it is placed in C:\Windows\System32.
+
*'''Phidget22.NET.dll''' is the Phidget library for .NET framework 2.0 or higher. Your compiler has to know where this file is. By default, it is placed into C:\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22. You can either point your compiler to that location, or copy and link to it in a directory for your project workspace.
+
You can optionally install the following files:
+
*'''Phidget22.NET.XML''' provides the IntelliSense in-line documentation for the .NET library in Visual Studio/MonoDevelop. This documentation is also visible in the Object Browser in Visual Studio. By default, it is placed into C:\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22.
+
  
Running the examples and writing your own code can be fairly compiler-specific, so we include instructions for each compiler below.
+
===Visual Studio===
 +
====Use our examples====
 +
One of the best ways to start programming with Phidgets is to use our example code as a guide. In order to run the examples, you will need to download and install [https://www.visualstudio.com/ Microsoft Visual Studio].
  
===Visual Studio 2015===
 
  
====Use Our Examples====
+
Now that you have Microsoft Visual Studio installed, select an example that will work with your Phidget:
Please start by downloading the examples and unpacking them into a folder. Since the examples were written in Visual Studio 2015, you will need to use Visual Studio 2015 or later in order to run the examples. To load all projects in Visual Studio, go to File → Open → Project, and open AllExamples/AllExamples.sln.
+
*{{SampleCode|VBNET|VB.NET Examples}}
  
The easiest way to confirm that your environment is set up properly will be to compile and run the HelloWorld Visual Basic .NET example.
 
  
Start by setting the HelloWorld project as your start up project.
+
Open the example project and start the example by pressing the ''Start'' button:
  
The only thing left to do is to run the example! Click on Debug → Start Debugging. Please note that the projects, by default try to find the Phidget22.NET.dll in the C:\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22. If you have it installed in another location, please change the path to the file's location accordingly. If you are receiving an error message regarding that the namespace Phidget22 cannot be found, please re-add the reference to Phidget22.NET.dll. Please see the [[#Write Your Own Code|Write Your Own Code]] section for details.
 
  
[[Image:VB_VS2015_Run.png|link=|600px]]
+
[[File:Csharp_visualstudio_run.png |link=|center]]
  
This program will detect for devices that are attached/detached on the computer. Go ahead, and attach or detach your devices! Here is an example output:
 
  
[[Image:VB_VS2015_HelloWorld_Output.png|link=|600px]]
+
The application will open the Phidget, list basic information about the Phidget, and demonstrate the Phidget's functionality. Here is an example of a Digital Output channel on a RFID Phidget:
  
After confirming that the HelloWorld example is working, you can proceed to run the example for your device. The source file will be named the same as the software object for your device. If you are not sure what the software object for your device is, find your Phidget on our [http://www.phidgets.com webpage], and then check the {{Phidget22API}} documentation for it.
 
  
Once you have the Visual Basic .NET examples running, we have a [[#Edit the Examples|teaching section]] below to help you follow them.
+
[[File:Csharp_visualstudio_rfid.PNG|link=|center]]
  
====Write Your Own Code====
 
  
When you are building a project from scratch, or adding Phidget function calls to an existing project, you'll need to configure your environment to properly link the Phidget .NET libraries. To begin:
+
You should now have the example up and running for your device. Play around with the device and experiment with some of the functionality. When you are ready, the next step is configuring your project and writing your own code!
  
1. Generate a new Visual Basic .NET Windows Applications project with a descriptive name such as PhidgetTest.
+
====Configure your project====
 +
When you are building a project from scratch, or adding Phidget functionality to an existing project, you'll need to configure your development environment to properly link the Phidget .NET library. To begin:
  
[[Image:VB_VS2015_New_Project.png|link=|600px]]
 
  
2. Add a reference to the Phidget .NET library.
+
Create a new Windows Forms Application project:
  
[[Image:VB_VS2015_Add_Reference.png|link=]]
 
  
3. Click Browse and navigate to the location of Phidget22.NET.dll, and add the file. If you used our installer, these files are installed in C:\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22, by default. If you have already done this for a previous project, you should be able to find Phidget22.NET.dll under the Browse → Recent tab.
+
[[Image:Vbnet_newproject.PNG|link=|center]]
  
[[Image:VB_VS2015_Add_Reference_2.png|link=|600px]]
 
  
The project now has access to the Phidget function calls and you are ready to begin coding.
+
Next, right-click to add a reference to the Phidget .NET library:
  
The same [[#Edit the Examples|teaching section]] which describes the examples also has further resources for programming your Phidget.
 
  
===Mono===
+
[[Image:CSharp_VS2015_Add_Reference.png|link=|center]]
  
This section will provide instructions on how to compile using the vbnc compiler.
 
  
====Use Our Examples====
+
On the following screen, click ''Browse...'' and navigate to the location of Phidget22.NET.dll:
 +
*C:\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22\Phidget22.NET.dll
  
We do not have Visual Basic .NET examples for the Mono framework. Fortunately, you can take a look at the source code for our [[#Example_Code|Visual Studio 2015 examples]] for valuable programming insight. We have a [[#Edit the Examples|teaching section]] below to help you follow them.
 
  
====Write Your Own Code====
+
[[Image:CSharp_VS2015_Add_Reference_2.png|link=|center]]
  
When you are building a project from scratch, or adding Phidget function calls to an existing project, you'll need to configure your compiler to properly link the Phidget .NET library.
 
  
Place '''Phidget22.NET.dll''' in the same directory as your source code. To compile and build an executable, run:
+
Finally, to include the Phidget .NET library, add the following lines to main window class file:
  
To compile and build an executable, run:
+
<syntaxhighlight lang="csharp">
 
+
Imports Phidget22
<syntaxhighlight lang='bash'>
+
Imports Phidget22.Events
vbnc /out:example.exe /r:phidget22.NET.dll Example.vb
+
 
</syntaxhighlight>
 
</syntaxhighlight>
  
If you have the Phidget22.NET.dll installed in another location, please change the path to the file's location accordingly.
+
Success! The project now has access to Phidgets. Next, view the [[#Write Code | write your own code]] section located below.
 
+
Afterwards, you will have an executable named example.exe that you can run. Type the following to run the program:
+
 
+
<syntaxhighlight lang='bash'>
+
mono example.exe
+
</syntaxhighlight>
+
 
+
The [[#Edit the Examples|teaching section]] also has further resources for programming your Phidget.
+
 
+
===MonoDevelop/Xamarin Studio===
+
  
 +
===Mono===
 
====Use Our Examples====
 
====Use Our Examples====
 +
One of the best ways to start programming with Phidgets is to use our example code as a guide. In order to run the examples, you will need to download and install [http://www.mono-project.com/download/ Mono] for Windows.
  
Download the [[#Example_Code|examples]] and unpack them into a folder. Here, you can find example programs for all the devices, as well as a HelloWorld program that will work with any Phidget. The source file will be named the same as the software object for your device. If you are not sure what the software object for your device is, find your Phidget on our [http://www.phidgets.com webpage], and then check the {{Phidget22API}} documentation for it.
 
  
These examples were written in Visual Studio 2015, but are also compatible with MonoDevelop/Xamarin Studio.
+
Now that you have Mono installed, download and unpack the HelloWorld example for C#:
 +
*[{{SERVER}}/downloads/phidget22/examples/dotnet/csharp/Manager/Phidget22_HelloWorld_CSharp_Windows_Ex.zip HelloWorld example]
 +
Note: The HelloWorld example is compatible with Mono because it does not use Windows Forms. All other C# examples use Windows Forms.
  
To load all projects in MonoDevelop/Xamarin Studio, go to File → Open, and open AllExamples/AllExamples.sln
 
  
This will load all of the examples available for Visual Basic .NET, and then you can set your main project to be the one that matches your device. If you are running under the .NET framework, you can use full examples. Otherwise, if you are running under the Mono framework, please only use the HelloWorld example. The full examples use Windows Forms, which is not completely compatible with Mono's Gtk#.
+
Next, copy Phidget22.NET.dll from type the following location:
 +
*C:\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22\Phidget22.NET.dll
  
[[Image: VB MonoDevelop setStartup.png|link=]]
 
  
The only thing left to do is to run the examples! Right click the project, and click on Run With and select the target framework. Please note that the projects, by default try to find the Phidget22.NET.dll in the C\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22. If you have it installed in another location, please change the path to the file's location accordingly. If you are receiving an error message regarding that the namespace Phidget22 cannot be found, please re-add the reference to Phidget22.NET.dll. Please see the [[#Write Your Own Code|Write Your Own Code]] section for details.
+
Place both the HelloWorld example and the Phidget22.NET.dll file in the same location. Your folder should now look something like this:
 +
[[File:Vbnet_folder.PNG|link=|center]]
  
[[Image: VB MonoDelevop Run.png|600px|link=]]
 
  
Once you have the Visual Basic .NET examples running, we have a [[#Edit the Examples|teaching section]] below to help you follow them.
+
Open the command prompt at the folder location and enter the following command:
 +
<syntaxhighlight lang='bash'>
 +
vbnc /r:Phidget22.NET.dll Module1.vb
 +
</syntaxhighlight>
  
====Write Your Own Code====
+
This will create an executable file called ''Module1.exe''. Type in the following command to run the example:
 +
<syntaxhighlight lang='bash'>
 +
mono Module1.exe
 +
</syntaxhighlight>
  
When you are building a project from scratch, or adding Phidget function calls to an existing project, you'll need to configure your development environment to properly link the Phidget .NET library. To begin:
 
  
1. Create a new Visual Basic .NET Console project with a descriptive name such as PhidgetTest.
+
[[File:Vbnet_mono.PNG|link=|center]]
  
[[Image: VB MonoDelevop NewProject.png|link=|600px]]
 
  
[[Image: VB MonoDelevop NewProject2.png|link=|600px]]
+
You should now have the example up and running. When you are ready, the next step is configuring your project and writing your own code!
  
2. Add a reference to the Phidget .NET library.
+
====Configure your project  - IN PROGRESS (LUCAS)====
 +
When you are building a project from scratch, or adding Phidget functionality to an exisiting project, you'll need to configure your development environment to properly link the Phidget .NET library.
  
[[Image: VB MonoDelevop EditReferences1.png|link=]]
+
To include the Phidget .NET library, simply add the following lines to your code:
 
+
<syntaxhighlight lang='CSharp'>
3. Select Phidget22.NET.dll. If you used our installer, by default, this file is placed in C:\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22. If it is in another location, please change the path to the file's location accordingly.
+
Imports Phidget22
 
+
Imports Phidget22.Events
[[Image: VB MonoDelevop EditReferences2.png|link=|600px]]
+
</syntaxhighlight>
 
+
The project now has access to the Phidget function calls and you are ready to begin coding.
+
  
The same [[#Edit The Examples|teaching section]] which describes the examples also has further resources for programming your Phidget.
+
The project now has access to Phidgets. Next, view the [[#Write Code | write your own code]] section located below.
  
== Edit the Examples ==
+
==Write Code==
  
 
By following the instructions for your operating system and compiler above, you probably now have a working example and want to understand it better so you can change it to do what you want. This teaching section has resources for you to learn from the examples and write your own.
 
By following the instructions for your operating system and compiler above, you probably now have a working example and want to understand it better so you can change it to do what you want. This teaching section has resources for you to learn from the examples and write your own.

Revision as of 20:58, 6 June 2017


Quick Downloads

Documentation

Example Code

Libraries and Drivers

Getting Started with VB.NET

Welcome to using Phidgets with VB.NET! By using VB.NET, you will have access to the complete Phidget22 API, including events. We also provide example code in VB.NET for all Phidget devices.

Windows

If you haven't already, please visit the Windows page before you continue reading. There you will be instructed on how to properly set up your Windows machine so you can follow the guides below!

Visual Studio

Use our examples

One of the best ways to start programming with Phidgets is to use our example code as a guide. In order to run the examples, you will need to download and install Microsoft Visual Studio.


Now that you have Microsoft Visual Studio installed, select an example that will work with your Phidget:


Open the example project and start the example by pressing the Start button:


Csharp visualstudio run.png


The application will open the Phidget, list basic information about the Phidget, and demonstrate the Phidget's functionality. Here is an example of a Digital Output channel on a RFID Phidget:


Csharp visualstudio rfid.PNG


You should now have the example up and running for your device. Play around with the device and experiment with some of the functionality. When you are ready, the next step is configuring your project and writing your own code!

Configure your project

When you are building a project from scratch, or adding Phidget functionality to an existing project, you'll need to configure your development environment to properly link the Phidget .NET library. To begin:


Create a new Windows Forms Application project:


Vbnet newproject.PNG


Next, right-click to add a reference to the Phidget .NET library:


CSharp VS2015 Add Reference.png


On the following screen, click Browse... and navigate to the location of Phidget22.NET.dll:

  • C:\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22\Phidget22.NET.dll


CSharp VS2015 Add Reference 2.png


Finally, to include the Phidget .NET library, add the following lines to main window class file:

Imports Phidget22
Imports Phidget22.Events

Success! The project now has access to Phidgets. Next, view the write your own code section located below.

Mono

Use Our Examples

One of the best ways to start programming with Phidgets is to use our example code as a guide. In order to run the examples, you will need to download and install Mono for Windows.


Now that you have Mono installed, download and unpack the HelloWorld example for C#:

Note: The HelloWorld example is compatible with Mono because it does not use Windows Forms. All other C# examples use Windows Forms.


Next, copy Phidget22.NET.dll from type the following location:

  • C:\Program Files\Phidgets\Phidget22\Phidget22.NET.dll


Place both the HelloWorld example and the Phidget22.NET.dll file in the same location. Your folder should now look something like this:

Vbnet folder.PNG


Open the command prompt at the folder location and enter the following command:

vbnc /r:Phidget22.NET.dll Module1.vb

This will create an executable file called Module1.exe. Type in the following command to run the example:

mono Module1.exe


Vbnet mono.PNG


You should now have the example up and running. When you are ready, the next step is configuring your project and writing your own code!

Configure your project - IN PROGRESS (LUCAS)

When you are building a project from scratch, or adding Phidget functionality to an exisiting project, you'll need to configure your development environment to properly link the Phidget .NET library.

To include the Phidget .NET library, simply add the following lines to your code:

Imports Phidget22
Imports Phidget22.Events

The project now has access to Phidgets. Next, view the write your own code section located below.

Write Code

By following the instructions for your operating system and compiler above, you probably now have a working example and want to understand it better so you can change it to do what you want. This teaching section has resources for you to learn from the examples and write your own. Your main reference for writing VB.NET code will be the Phidget22 API Manual.

Code Snippets

The following code snippets describe how to do various general tasks with Phidgets. You should be able to find places in the examples where these snippets exist, and modify them to suit your requirements.

Step One: Initialize and Open

The Open() function opens the software object, but not hardware. So, it is not a guarantee you can use the Phidget immediately.

For example, if we were using an Digital Input as our device, the create and open calls would look like this:

device = New Phidget22.DigitalInput()
device.Open()

Step Two: Wait for Attachment (plugging in) of the Phidget

To use the Phidget, it must be plugged in (attached). We can handle this simply by calling open with a number as a parameter in place of the basic open. This function works for any Phidget. This will block until a connection is made to the Phidget, or the specified timeout is exceeded:

device.Open(5000);

Sometimes, it makes more sense to handle the attachment via an event. This would be in instances where the Phidget is being plugged and unplugged, and you want to handle these incidents. Or, when you want to use event-driven programming because you have a GUI-driven program. In these cases, an event-driven code snippet to handle the attachment might look something like this:

Private Sub device_Attach(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As Phidget22.Events.AttachEventArgs) Handles device.Attach
  Dim attachedDevice As Phidget22.Phidget = CType(sender, Phidget22.Phidget)
  Dim serialNumber as Integer
  Dim deviceName as String
  serialNumber = attachedDevice.DeviceSerialNumber;
  deviceName = attachedDevice.DeviceName;
  Console.WriteLine("Hello Device {0},  Serial Number: {1}!", deviceName, serialNumber.ToString());
End Sub

Step Three: Do Things with the Phidget

We recommend the use of event driven programming when working with Phidgets. This allows the program to execute other tasks until the Phidget generates a new event. You can hook a custom function into an event trigger like this, using a Digital Input Phidget as an example:

Private Sub device_DigitalInputChange(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As Phidget22.Events.DigitalInputStateChangeEventArgs) Handles device.StateChange
  textBox1.Text = "State: " + e.State;
End Sub

Some values can be directly read and set on the Phidget. These functions can be used inside a polling loop as an alternative to event driven programming. The line inside the loop would be something like this, after which you could do something with the value:

val = device.State;

device.State = true;

Step Four: Close and Delete

At the end of your program, be sure to close your device.

Private Sub Form1_FormClosing(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.Windows.Forms.FormClosingEventArgs) Handles Me.FormClosing
    device.Close();
End Sub

Further Reading

Phidget Programming Basics - Here you can find the basic concepts to help you get started with making your own programs that use Phidgets.

Data Interval/Change Trigger - Learn about these two properties that control how much data comes in from your sensors.

Using Multiple Phidgets - It can be difficult to figure out how to use more than one Phidget in your program. This page will guide you through the steps.

Polling vs. Events - Your program can gather data in either a polling-driven or event-driven manner. Learn the difference to determine which is best for your application.

Logging, Exceptions, and Errors - Learn about all the tools you can use to debug your program.

Phidget Network Server - Phidgets can be controlled and communicated with over your network- either wirelessly or over ethernet.